career coach

5 Ways You Are Killing Your Sales Deals

1.
Not selling the solution
People and companies buy things only in an attempt to
solve a problem. There is NO exception to this rule.
When salespeople spend too much time on the offer, the
product or the much talked about value add, and forget to
focus on ensuring the that you can solve the problem.
This typically results in presentations that are too long and
prices that are too low. The real problem your customer is
trying to solve is o\en missed by the enthusiast sales
person that is excited simply to demonstrate their
product.
Focus on finding the dominant problem or problems the
customer would most like to solve by seeing you. You
might ask, “If I could magically solve two or three
recurring issues for you with this what would they be?”
Then incorporate how your product and the company can
solve the most important and maybe two or three other
recurring problems your client is trying to solve.
People close when they are hopefully confident their
problems can be solved.

 

2.
Missing Buying Signals
I have seen salespeople so invested in their product
presentation and so dependent on their slideshow they
are no longer aware of vital buying signals.
Remind yourself to be present during your presentation. I
am sure you invested a lot of Qme in your presentation—
whether it is a slideshow, flip chart, conference call, Skype
or whatever the case—and probably is one of the best in
the history of presentations, but the customer’s vital
buying signs are more important than your presentation.
Don’t neglect buying signals during your presentation. And
don’t get so automatic with your presentation that you
are just delivering it.
Have a great presentation prepared but pay attention to
what is important – the signs from everyone in the room
that is a decision maker or influencer. Ask a lot of
questions and get involvement and always look for
opportunists to close early.

3.
Refuse to Ask Hard Questions
It is my experience that sales people miss opportunists to
build trust because they are unwilling to ask hard
questions. This either comes from naivety or a lack of
proper training. Real closers have real communication
with their clients.
I was on a sales call with one of my top people and while
he was presenter to the group I sensed that the decision
maker wasn’t buying the presentation.
I interrupted, “you don’t believe a word of what he is
saying, do you?” The client started laughing and said that
was exactly what he was thinking.
Ask hard questions: “How do you feel about our pricing?”
“How do you feel about our terms?” “Why would you do
business with me when you have done it with our
competitor for so long?”
Also when you ask questions make sure you get them
answered. If you don’t get the answers to the hard
questions you will find yourself not closing deals and not
knowing why.

4.
Believing Price Will Solve Problems
No one buys a price, ever!
I have been in sales my entire adult life and have been
tricked by thousands of buyers who said “price is the only
issue.”
Your buyer is obsessed with price, always demanding your
lowest price, and claims that price and budget are their
most important concerns. Despite all this energy your
customer invests in trying to sell you this idea—it’s
ridiculous.
Every buyer will pay a higher price. The same customer
that gets you to a lower price returns to the marketplace
and continues to spend the same money they told you
was so important.
To perfect this skill and close the price-obsessed buyer
takes a commitment to and assortment of advanced
closes.

5.
Presenter Without the Intention to Close
When I start a presentation I make it clear to the prospect
that my intention is to have the product or service being
used by the client this week.
“Thanks for your your time today, my goal is to have my
product to your company by the end of this week.”
The customer usually then tells me they have no intention
of doing anything that quickly, at which point I simply say,
“I understand. I just wanted you to know my intention.”
You have to present with confidence, not arrogance, and
set the stage early showing that you know your product
can solve their problems. Open with your intention to
close the deal. Be transparent and obvious about what it is
you hope to accomplish.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: